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Bells

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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 11:39am

Breastfeeding Basics - What to Expect

The weeks just before you go into labour are often filled with precision planning, boredom and discomfort; any new Mum will tell you that this period is the calm before the storm. When labour starts it’s essentially the beginning of an entire month or two of worry and sleep deprivation. When baby is born you no longer have time to wash, eat, sleep or get dressed..... many women come out of hospital immediately and attempt to lurch straight back into normal life. If you want to breastfeed you’re going to have to try very very hard to take some time after the birth of your baby to establish feeding.

Your newborn has been created with an inbuilt urge to survive. Your baby’s strongest reflex is the urge to feed and to ensure that his Mother’s milk supply is abundant. For the first few days your breasts produce colostrum. This thick, golden liquid is the most perfect food your baby can swallow. It primes the gut, is packed full of antibodies and helps baby produce good bacteria ready to digest milk a few days down the line.



What to expect in the first few days:

Tiredness, tiredness, tiredness, weepiness, the inability to make decisions, a barrage of advice from every Tom, Dick or Harry that crosses your path, a baby that won’t let you put him/her down, the feeling of helplessness that makes you think “oh my, I have no clue what I’m doing!” and of course you’re sore too. Feeling that you don’t know how to cope or that you’re doing it wrong are normal. As someone said to me today, as a Mum your default setting is ‘guilt’.


How exactly do I breastfeed?

Many people dangle their nipple in front of the baby and expect baby to just suck on it. You can do this for about 36 hours before the pain in your nipples gets really bad! To breastfeed you must first get you and your baby in a comfortable and supported position. Your baby is still quite light but that’s no excuse to take baby’s weight in your arms (or you’ll end up with aching arms and shoulders). Stuff cushions, pillows, rolled up blankets under your elbows and on your lap OR lie on your side in bed. Get baby’s nose level with your nipple, hold your breast between your thumb and fingers, tickle his top lip with your nipple while squeezing out a drop onto his lips. He should tip his head back and open his mouth wide. At this precise point squeeze your breast gently to make it a bit flatter, bring him quickly close to you and (here’s a technical term) stuff as much of you into his mouth as possible. It’s called BREASTfeeding not nipplefeeding. Get as much in there as you can so that his gums can work the breast tissue, stimulate your breasts to release the milk that’s already in there and produce more.


A Babymoon: Establishing Breastfeeding

Take your baby to bed, for a week if you can. It sounds incredibly old fashioned but 40 years ago women were kept in hospital for ten whole days and weren’t allowed out until they were breastfeeding successfully. They came out of hospital confident, rested, bonded, healed and ready to face the world. We leave hospital after 6 hours, have women trying to cope with life, a new baby, visitors, family and housework ... and we call this progress.

Take your baby to bed, strip her off, lie her on your bare chest, wrap your dressing gown around you both, snuggle down with a magazine, a pint of water, a box of chocs, a sandwich and some daytime telly. Remain there for a week!


My Baby is Too Hungry!!

An innate urge to suck means that babies want to suck all the time. It’s comforting, keeps them warm, keeps them with their mother, keeps their food supply up, it’s comfortable, it feels, smells and tastes great. Why WOULDN’T your baby want to be on the breast all day?? Feeding every three to four hours isn't normal for a newborn, feeding constantly is. It isn’t a sign that your baby is too hungry, it isn’t a sign that you’re not making enough milk (if it is it quickly fixes itself) it’s not a sign that anything is wrong. It’s nature and it’s normal. The solution is to feed frequently to increase your supply. The more you feed the more milk your breasts will make. It takes anything for a day to a few days to increase a milk supply. Feeding less (topping up with formula) tells your body to produce less milk. After a few days things should begin to calm down.


My Baby Won’t Latch on!

How old is he? Did you have a difficult or traumatic birth? Did you have Pethedine close to the time you delivered? Does your baby have mucus in his nose or chest? Is his tongue able to move freely in and out of his mouth? All of these will impact on your feeding. A very new baby may need a few days to get the hang of things. Is your baby tired of already full? Some babies don’t ‘need’ to suckle so much or for as often depending on your milk flow and technique.


My Mum/Sister/Aunty/Friend/Health Visitor said he’s not getting enough milk:

Family, friends and even health professionals are often the bearers of inaccurate advice. In the absence of transparent breasts bearing handy volume measurements it’s VERY difficult to gauge how much milk a baby is taking. Take into account breast size, quantity of milk producing breast tissue, feeding techniques, sucking pace, swallow pace, the age of your baby and a dozen other variables and you have a hard time working this out. IF your baby is pink, alert, interested in his surroundings and is producing plenty of wet nappies per day then chances are your baby is getting enough milk.


My Baby has dropped her Birth weight:

Your baby spent 9 months (ish) submerged in fluid. When he’s born there’s a percentage of his weight that’s just water, he’s essentially waterlogged. It’s normal for babies to lose around 10% of their birthweight in the 7-10 days after birth. Even dipping below this is acceptable if baby is feeding well. If your baby isn’t feeding so well and has lost more than 10% birth weight then do enlist the help of a breastfeeding counsellor before you venture near your Health Visitor or midwife (who may tell you to top up with formula)


But My Baby isn’t Gaining Enough Weight!!
According to who? The chart in the back of your red book is based on average weights for artificially fed infants. Tell your HV to plot your baby's weight on a breastfed baby chart.

Breastmilk = Easily digested, builds nerves and brains. Invented for humans who do not need bulk or strength until long after birth.

Formula milk = Harder to digest, builds faster bone density and adds bulk. Derived from cow milk for baby cows who need to weight bear large bodies within hours of being born.

A breastfed baby is often (but not always) slower to gain bulk than a bottlefed baby. This is one of the reasons your baby is less prone to obesity in later life. A bulky baby isn’t necessarily a healthy baby.


My friend’s baby is bottlefed and seems more settled:

Your friend’s baby’s digestive system needs to work FAR harder to digest and utilise their feeds. It’s hard work and hangs around longer in the digestive system.... and so she will often go for longer periods between feeds.This isn't a benchmark to aim for, a baby's tiny tummy and immature gut is designed to take easily digested and easily absorbed milk at frequent intervals. As the formula is hard to digest it’s harder to break down and so her tummy has to work harder, producing gas and often colic. No matter how you choose to feed your baby you’re likely to encounter some difficulties at some point.


I tried to express and barely got anything out:

Ideally you would wait three months before even looking at a breastpump. Expressing milk isn’t as stimulating for your breast as suckling your baby so if you’re struggling to feed and decided to express to see what your milk production’s like, your findings will probably be inaccurate. Expressing is a poorer way of getting milk out, it doesn’t stimulate your breasts as well as feeding and if you can avoid it during the first four weeks then do.


Why can’t I ‘top up’ with formula if I want to breastfeed?

Your body is finely tuned to produce exactly the precise quantity of milk your baby needs. Your milk is dynamic, changing volume and consistency as and when your baby needs it to. If you miss a feed your body will automatically alter the amount of milk it makes. If you miss several feeds you may find that your milk supply decreases. Your body produces its milk making hormone during the night, if you miss night feeds the impact on your milk supply will be greater.
Babies on bottles only need to suck lightly and consistently for a quick meal. A breastfed baby needs to work harder, his gums need to massage the breast and the milk comes out at some rate between gushing and seeping depending how long he’s been on the breast. The phrase ‘nipple confusion’ is more accurately described as ‘nipple frustration’ as your baby gets cross at the effort involved in breastfeeding.

The main reason you’ve been ‘warned’ of this method is because it’s often easier to give bottles and once this is discovered many women believe that the combination of less milk in her breasts, quicker and more convenient feeds, more time between feeds and more freedom is a sure fire pointer that formula milk suits her baby more than breastmilk. This is the reason that ‘topping up’ is often the first step towards cessation of breastfeeding.


It Hurts - Does that mean I'm doing it wrong?

You will very often hear 'if it hurts you're doing it wrong'. Many successful breastfeeders will concur that it often does hurt 'at first' for one reason or another. If you were to suck the back of your hand really really hard, 12 hours a day for a week. It would hurt. While your nipple gets used to being stretched to the back of your baby's throat it's going to take some adjusting. If you combine this with being too tired to establish a '100% perfect latch' every time and very often a baby who is sucking constantly then there will be times when you feel downbeaten because it's hurting and therefore you must be doing it wrong.

It's imperative that you perfect your latch as quickly as you can, get into good habits. At 4am when you haven't slept for a week, dangling a nipple inside your baby's mouth may give you 13 minutes of sleep but it will make you sore.

Once established, breastfeeding doesn't hurt a bit. Once your nipples are used to being stretched, you milk productions settles, your baby isn't on as much, your recovered from labour and you're getting some sleep it IS easy peasy, painfree and hassle free.


I feel guilty:

You cannot successfully breastfeed out of guilt. It isn't a competition where you're a better parent if you breastfeed or proof that you love your child more if you breastfeed. Breastfeeding is a personal choice that some women feel passionately about because they want to do it for personal reasons. Many try it, encounter problems, misadvice and very poor help from their trusted health professionals. Many women just expect it to happen and are taken aback when it doesn't. Many women fall at the first hurdle because their families and friends didn't know how to help them. Some women get the wrong advice and make what they feel was a premature decision to cease breastfeeding. Here on FZ we want to help those who want to breastfeed without alienating those who don't. Never mix up our intentions to help. If help isn't wanted it can feel like pressure but if someone wants to succeed we hope it's seen as support.

There is no time to waste when your baby is here, the calm before the storm is over, you're hurled right into a non-stop regime of feeding, nappies, crying (you and the baby!), tiredness and decisions. A day can feel like a week and a week like a month. In a matter of hours you can go from confident about breastfeeding to reaching for a bottle. As long as you're prepared for what to expect, armed with information and know where to turn if it goes pear shaped then you're in a good position to breastfeed your baby.



There's a basic 2 minute video on breastfeeding here ...... HERE








Indiechick

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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 12:44pm

Brilliant Bells, thank you !!! x


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
2 beautiful boys born 16/04/09

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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 2:01pm

absolutley fab bells, some really really useful info there that i wish i'd have had when i started breastfeeding high5
i would recommend anyone planning to breastfeed prints this out and puts in their hospital bag!! :happy:
Proud mom of the most beautiful twin girlies!!
2 angels in heaven, never forgotten

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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 3:58pm

This is brilliant! I wasn't at all prepared for how hard it would be and agree that printing this out and packing it in your hospital bag is a good idea.

The feeling of guilt really can be overwhelming and if you encounter problems it really knocks you for six. Go with the flow i say and relax.....i wish i'd been able to do that. :smile:




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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 8:03pm

Thanx!
This is really useful information - I could have done with it last time round, it certainly explains a lot!


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Tuesday, February 10th 2009, 9:37pm

Spot on! :D

Hubby used to call me Mummy Moo cow! :rolleyes: :D

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Sunday, February 15th 2009, 7:16am

Thanks for the information. I wish I'd done a bit more resaerch on breast feeding before Riya was born.

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Thursday, April 16th 2009, 7:20pm

One thing that nobody every tells you is that it does hurt at first. And getting sore cracked nipples isn't just a symptom of a poorly latched baby, it's just your poor nipples getting used to it! It's like hot knives being stuck through you!

I got really frustrated while I was in hospital cos my milk hadn't come in, and there clearly wasn't enough coming out to satisfy Lochlan. He sucked harder and harder, I ended up in tears, he ended up hungry and nobody was winning. The midwives were great but unfortunately they all seemed to be breastfeeding purists, and were unable to advise me as to what to do, other than persevere. Not easy to persevere under that sort of pain, and when you are so exhausted. One midwife suggested I use cup feeding to top Lochlan up after a feed, not every time, but just so I could get a couple of hours sleep and let my supply regenerate. I did this about 3 times in hospital, (under the watchful frowns of the other midwives), then a couple of times at home, and once, shock horror, I even gave him a couple of ounces of formula milk in a bottle as I was just so exhausted and in so much pain! Just these few little breaks helped me to get back in control of things, and I also then decided (again, against the purist midwives advice) to use nipple shields for a while to let my nipples recover. I have been using them for about 4 days now, one side is healed and the other is nearly. Lochlan is feeding fine, my milk has come in and is plentiful and the pain-stress-pain factor is gone.

Sometimes you need to step away from things and look at the big picture to find a solution. It won't be the same for everyone, but there's usually a way of sorting these early problems out there somewhere. Don't give up though, breast feeding is the most wonderful thing!
Me 35,DH 36 (Severe Oligospermia.).
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Thomas Derren (Thom) July 1990
Luke Benjamin August 1993
Harley John Oliver June 1997
Alexandria Aimee Jay (Alex) July 1998
Lochlan Cassius James April 2009 (4th attempt at ICSI)



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Friday, April 17th 2009, 9:54am

Here here Mrs S - I know bf is best but it can put you under huge pressure at a time when you are at your most fragile. It sounds like you have everything under control now - well done you.

Might go and invest in some nipple shields just in case.

xx

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Friday, April 17th 2009, 10:21am

All great advice!
I was reading 'somewhere' online (can't remember where exactly....mummy brain!) that 'they' (can't remember who...oh, maybe it was WHO actually!) are going to revise the growth charts to reflect the weight of breastfed babies instead of bottle fed. - is that right ?
Think Lachlan may still be 'big' :snigger:
Mayo

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This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "mayo" (Apr 17th 2009, 10:55am)


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Saturday, May 2nd 2009, 7:11pm

I just want to say it isnt all bad. I knew that all my family members who ever tried to breastfeed ( including my mother) failed and gave up atfer 3 days with sore cracked nipples....I was really expecting the same.

Something really obvious twigged, that your milk does not come out in abundance instantly, it is the regular suckling of your infant to your breast that stimulates the milk production.
The midwifes dont seem to tell you that your milk takes a day or two to come in, meanwhile your baby could easily suckle for hours till your nipples feel like theyre going to fall off.
So just often and in moderation taking your baby to your breast so that the nipples dont get sore, worked in my case.
Two days later my milk came in. And my nipples never got even slightly sore.

I hope that makes some sense! I just wanted so share my story, it isnt always a painful experience.
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Saturday, May 2nd 2009, 7:34pm

Sorry had to post again as wouldnt let me edit after 5 minutes!

What really worked for me is that after a couple of hours of baby to breast, (before I twigged what the knack was) one midwife gave baby a small amount of formula to curb her appetite and then I got some rest and so did my daughter. This then allowed me to do the "little and often" thing that saved my nipples!

I am not a fan of purist midwifes, they can easily scare you and get you into a complete state! The first one that looked after me in hospital said to me 3 hours after birth..." you havent put your baby to the breast yet? well thats it! it maybe too late to ever breastfeed!" Can you believe that!
babydust

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Sunday, May 3rd 2009, 8:47pm

Equally don't be bullied into giving your baby "just a little bit of formula to give your milk a chance to come in" if thats not what you want to do. with my first little girl the midwives gave her a syringe of formula without the permission of myself or my husband while I was in surgery. It took a while after that to establish feeding

I think the most important lesson I learned second time around is never to wear a bra to bed. I don't usually do that, but when Pud was a couple of days old my boobs just felt so huge and pendulus that I thought I'd keep them under control. The result was an horrendous case of mastitis which made bfing excruciatingly painful for a good fortnight. This bad start lead to me giving up on bfing early at around 14 weeks which was a big disappointment after my first experience with bfing. Don't wear a bra to bed!







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Sunday, May 3rd 2009, 10:10pm

absolutly brilliant advice xxx



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Monday, May 4th 2009, 3:57pm

Quoted

Originally posted by poddy
I am not a fan of purist midwifes, they can easily scare you and get you into a complete state! The first one that looked after me in hospital said to me 3 hours after birth..." you havent put your baby to the breast yet? well thats it! it maybe too late to ever breastfeed!" Can you believe that!

I can believe that but let me just say this for anyone who has trouble at the start:

I actually gave up breastfeeding completely after a few days as i felt so exhausted and just didn't think that i could do it, i expressed for a few days to keep some production going and then changed my mind and one day just decided to put my baby on my breast to see what would happen - that was the best thing i ever did as it was the turning point and i managed to gradually get her back on the breast and get my supply up.

As long as you are producing milk it is never too late! So :P to that midwife!!




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Monday, May 4th 2009, 9:04pm

Thats a lovely story Michelle! :D
babydust

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Monday, December 28th 2009, 7:13pm

Hello,

I know its been a while since anyone posted on here but I've met a wonderful midwife who was great at telling us about bf.

She told us that you only produce 5ml of breast milk in your first 24 hours and then providing everything is going ok with bf it triples every 24 hours. She actually showed us how much it was and it was literally nothing!!! So she said don't let the hospital midwives push you around and try make you give formula. She also told us that baby's tummy when born is the size of a marble and then slowly it gets bigger until eventually it gets to the size of a walnut. Also she told us about lansinoh and about how amazing it is as its natural so doesn't harm baby or you when feeding. She also told us that formula fed babies sleep more because the formula is more difficult for baby to digest so they sleep for longer, where as breast milk is easier to digest so baby wakes up more! And not only is it good for helping baby grow but each individual's breast milk is specially catered for their individual baby for all aspects of development, not just growth but for mental and emotional development too! Amazing!!

She also told us about a woman who got no support until she went in 3 weeks later and they have now successfully established bf.

She gave me so much hope and confidence about bf and it wasn't like she was really pushing it onto us, just giving us facts and making us feel good about it.

Fingers crossed I can do it now after all this!!!






Our miracle was born on 25.02.2010!!



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Thursday, May 6th 2010, 12:08pm

My twin breast feeding experience

Hi Bells, I've typed this up now - would you like me to post it? It's a bit long so I don't want to bore anyone to whom it's not relevant.







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
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1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
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cs booked for 20/04/10

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Thursday, May 6th 2010, 12:16pm

Well I for one would love to read it. I need all the info I can get! :D x

My Diary - Bry and the Flumps!


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Friday, May 7th 2010, 4:26pm

My Twin Breastfeeding Experience

Thanks Bry. Here it is:

I breastfed my first born for 15 months and was committed to breastfeeding my second child. When the pregnancy turned out to be a twin one, I had the same intention. However, from the point at which I attended the twin antenatal days held at the hospital, the message from the health professionals seemed to be one of, whilst not actively discouraging exclusive breastfeeding, an implication that it was unlikely that this was practical or possible and that mixed feeding was more realisable. The two sets of parents who came along to talk about their experiences were either feeding their twins with Artificial Infant Milk (AIM) or mixed feeding.

I started to wonder if exclusive breastfeeding was possible with twins but, fortunately, the internet proved to be a good resource in finding other mothers who had exclusively breastfed and I corresponded with a few of them to gain knowledge and advice. I wanted to be as prepared as possible and read up on breastfeeding generally and found the La Leche book “Mothering Multiples” to be really helpful, although almost a little too detailed pre-birth. The prospect of breastfeeding for 12 hours plus a day seemed daunting, but at least I had an idea of what to expect. I also contacted the NCT in advance of the birth to get some contact details of breastfeeding counsellors in case I had any problems. Having breastfed already, I felt it was important to be able to access help urgently if a difficulty arose.

I started to tell people “I will be breastfeeding these babies” when asked, rather than the more equivocal “I hope to breastfeed”. I bit my tongue and nodded at well meaning friends who told me not to put any undue pressure on myself in case it turned out to be too much to take on.

After a straightforward elective caesarean birth, the twins were put to my breast immediately in tandem and fed for five hours!

The intensity of that first week was incredible. I could not have survived without the EZ2 Nurse feeding pillow or Lansinoh! At first, the babies did not have a strong latch and one would latch on and slip off after a few minutes, or if I latched one on and turned to latch on the other, the first would slip off as I did so and the process would need to be restarted. This had the effect of causing my nipples to be incredibly sore, which is to be expected initially in any attempt to breastfeed, but they had a lot more trauma than if I had been feeding a singleton. On the first night after surgery, bedbound as I still had a catheter in, it felt like I had buzzed the midwives a hundred times to help me latch the babies onto my nipples. My milk took a while to come in (I suspect it didn’t do fully until about nine or ten days as it was only then that I began to feel engorged) and the colostrum did not satisfy the babies for very long so they wanted to feed sometimes literally every five minutes or so. The babies were more settled in the day and frustratingly would be calm and sleepy during visiting hours when my partner was there – I kept insisting to him that it wasn’t like this at night (once home he soon realised this was true!) Late afternoon they would start to cluster feed furiously until about 7 am the following day. I was feeding almost constantly and getting about an hour’s sleep per night. One night I only slept from 4am to 4.25 am! I felt a little crazed with sleep deprivation by the time I left hospital but I knew that once home it would be easier as I had my partner and mother to support me, rather than having to share the nighttimes with an overworked midwife and ward support staff amongst twenty other women.

On the whole, the midwives at the hospital were encouraging of my intentions. However, among some of the staff, any complaint about how hard I was finding breastfeeding resulted in what seemed to be the knee jerk advice that I could “top up” or switch to AIM. For example, on Day 2, I complained about my sore nipples which had blisters on blisters and were cracked and a little bloody. “What can I do about this?” Rather than recommending nipple cream (which I found worked wonders) or expressing a little milk onto them and letting them air dry, AIM was suggested. When I said I was absolutely exhausted following four days of near constant breastfeeding, AIM was suggested instead of words of encouragement or advice that this initial intensity was to be expected but would pass. When things were really hard in the nights, I went so far as repeating mantras to myself, such as “Formula does not exist in my world” and reminding myself that if I was in Norway, I wouldn’t have access to AIM without a prescription and if I lived in some parts of the world, wouldn’t have access to AIM at all! On discharge, staff were delighted when I stuck it out and were very complimentary of my determination and efforts.

Once home, I continued to feed constantly for the next few days. That was my full time 24/7 job. My partner did everything else including putting the babies onto the EZ2 for me, nappy changes, winding, washing, clothes changing, cooking and my mother looked after our toddler. The babies had lost 8 and 9% of their body weight and, although they had been slowly regaining it, by day 7, when feeding had started to calm down a little, my community midwife was concerned that twin 1 had “static” weight gain. She had gained only 20g in 3 days. Her “protocols” told her that the weight gain should be averaging 30g per day. I had been pleased that the previous night the twins had slept for five hours but this was frowned upon and I was told I needed to wake them if they slept for more than 3 hours. She also suggested that I “top up” with AIM. When I refused, she contacted a colleague who suggested the same. She went away saying that she would return in two days to check on the twins’ progress. I was feeling really anxious and upset myself by this time and also quite undermined. This is where my contacts came into their own. I phoned the breastfeeding counsellor who asked whether the midwife’s charts were adjusted for twins (they were not) and whether she had taken on board the fact that I’d had a caesarean so my milk would be slower to come in. Also, she asked me how I thought the babies were doing (very well) and said she would not have a cause for concern unless they had failed to regain their body weight by 14 to 21 days. I consulted my GP who gratifyingly agreed: unless there was a “scrawny” baby who was losing weight or failing to thrive, then she was not worried until the 3 week mark. My La Leche book reminded me that AIM should only be given if there was a good medical reason for doing so and that giving AIM or expressing breastmilk at such an early stage and giving it via a teat might result in a baby that was less likely to want to suckle at the breast – I reminded myself that demand dictated my milk supply and settled down with my EZ2 for some determined hours of full on nursing. By day 10, twin 1 had regained her body weight and more (putting on 190g in two days) and twin 2 had done so by day 14. My milk came in and supply no longer seemed to be an issue.

It’s day 16 now and here I am at my computer typing up my experience so things have certainly improved! The babies are sleeping for 3 hour stretches and in the night they wake about 3am and 6am for a feed. It is so much more manageable and we have left the house on 3 or 4 occasions – life is resembling something approaching normality and we seemed to be over the difficult bit.

It’s been incredibly hard work and so tiring but I’m so glad I stuck it out. I have to be honest and say I don’t know how possible it would have been without the support of at least one other adult round the clock (my mum came and stayed for the first two weeks, in addition to my partner being there). The twins are doing fantastically and I feel quietly confident that we can continue to breastfeed and it will get only more straightforward as they grow and develop.







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

Bells

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Friday, May 7th 2010, 4:48pm

Oh wow!!! You deserve a thread of your own....!!!!

I'm going to copy this thread into Multiples but leave a copy here because it's just fab!!!





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Friday, May 7th 2010, 5:07pm

Roxy thanks for sharing your story I will definately use your advice x


Kirstin's Parenting Diary






Jan 09 Icsi BFN May 09 Fet BFN Sept 09 Icsi BFN Jan 10 :BFP:
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Indiechick

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Friday, May 7th 2010, 5:15pm

Well done Roxy, your doing a fab job! I must admit it took me a lot longer to get to where you are now. infact it took me 6 weeks to get to the point where I felt it was going to be ok and that my nipples would at some point return to normal. I too was constantly advised to put the boys on formula especially as they lost weight but like you I stuck to it and am so glad I did. Breast feeding the boys has been my biggest achievement . . . . . . . after having them that is!

Keep at it girlie cos as you say, once your over the hard bit it just gets easier and easier, big hugs to your little ladies x


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
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roxy7

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Saturday, May 8th 2010, 2:47pm

Oh wow!!! You deserve a thread of your own....!!!!

I'm going to copy this thread into Multiples but leave a copy here because it's just fab!!!

Awww, thanks Bells!

And Kirtin and Indie. Day 17 and things are really seeming much calmer. One thing I would also mention is that I let the girls stay on me sucking for as long as they wanted in the first two weeks, even when it seemed they had finished feeding. It really stimulated my milk supply I think and the La Leche book says that getting your supply up is really important (and easiest to do) in the first two weeks.







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "roxy7" (May 8th 2010, 2:50pm)





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