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Rufus

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  • "Rufus" started this thread

Posts: 1,259

Reg: Oct 3rd 2005

Location: N Ireland

Children: One son, aged 8, daughter 1

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Thursday, March 9th 2006, 7:01pm

Dyspraxia

Had my ds parent teacher interview on Monday and the teacher reckons my ds is exhibiting some early signs of dyspraxia. I know he struggles to put on clothes and feeding himself is also an issue. Like me, he is a bit clumsy.

Does anyone know how much dyspraxia is a name for poor co-ordination adn clumsiness? Or if he is not yet 5 until April, if that would have anything ot do with it?

Having one son I don't have anyone to compare him to and the children I teach are older. It's also not something I have a great deal of experience with.

i am not unduly worried as his speech and reading are excellent - however I know he struggles with writing and finds pen control difficult. I just thought he'd grow out of it...

Any help welcomed oxox
Keep smiling :happy:

Missy

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Thursday, March 9th 2006, 7:18pm

Rufus, my little brother has it, it is the exact opposite of dyslexia, dyslexic children usually have reading and writing difficulty but many show excellent co-ordination skills and are often very good at sports. This makes dyspraxic children poor at co-ordinating activities, like catching a ball for instance - the brain does actually react very quickly but the message has a delay reaching the hands. Because of the brains ability to reac quickly dyspraxia sufferers are usually very good at reading and arithmatic.

My LB is in the top sets at school, and his dyspraxia is improving with age, he would struggle tying his shoe laces, and when he used to step into his trousers he would fall over as he had poor balance.

Also, explaining some things to him is quite difficult, unlike a child who haven't got dyspraxia who will happily accept that black is black 'just because!', my little brother needs a clear cut explanation for everything - there can be no grey areas!

I hope this is a little clearer for you! Like you said, there is no reason at all to be worried, some co-ordination exercises might help also, like throwing and catching. My LB also took up karate to help improve his balance

xxx








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Friday, March 10th 2006, 6:05am

... little known fact....

I have dyspraxia although it wasnt diagnosed until I was an adult.

My biggest problems as a child were co-ordination sports which left me with low self confidence because I was crap at hockey/netball/tennis etc. However, I was very good at swimming - less co-ordination required there ;)

I did extremely well academically, getting a 1st class Hons degree, and a Masters degree by the age of 23.

My biggest symptom as an adult is that I know the words and what I want to say, but my mouth doesnt always speak it - I find it very hard to explain to people when speaking what I mean to say, so I have learnt to check with people afterwards if they understood my explanation or if I should try and phrase it a different way.

It's great that they have recognised this in your son already, as exercises and physio will help him so very much.

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Friday, March 10th 2006, 6:09am

ps buy an encylopaedia brittanica - it was the only way my parents could shut me up with the "...but why..."s! :D

Missy

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Friday, March 10th 2006, 8:05am

Did I explain it quite well there then Sun??

LB also has low self esteem, and always has 'tummy ache' on PE day at school, he is however brilliant at Karate, and excelled past the other children who started at the same time as him by 2 belts!!! :D He is also a child genius too!

xxx








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Saturday, March 11th 2006, 1:14am

sam - yup! :)

I also used to feign sickness or diarrhoea on PE days, but similarly was good at repetitive action things which is why swimming was good - they didnt have karate in my time!

the low self-esteem thing still continues, but that I think is more due to the lateness of diagnosis than as an actual symptom.

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Saturday, March 11th 2006, 7:45am

I reccomend you speak with your GP before doing or assuming anything.
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Missy

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Saturday, March 11th 2006, 12:23pm

Yes, providing your GP is nothing like ours - they didn't diagnose my LB until he was 7, and like Sun says hers was missed until adulthood. I think if a teacher has noticed it then the possibility is that DS is affected.

My LB was simply labelled as a 'clumsy child' or an attention seeker, as he was having terrible tantrums, what we now interpret as frustration on his part at not being able to express himself properly.

Our GP also thought my mum was over-reacting at what they thought was the terrible 2's. He would hold his breath, once until his lips turned blue or bang his head on the floor, walls and doors. But these tantrums were completely out of the blue and seemed to have no trigger. Eventually, he threw a tantrum at the doctors and she was so shocked she referred him to a behavioural therapist, who at first thought he had ADHD, but after counselling and co-ordination and literacy tests he was correctly diagnosed. It wasn't a case of just handing him a tablet though. He was given simple co-ordination exercises as Sun mentioned, and has improved with age.

I would say trust your instinct like my mum did, if you think there is something in what DS's teacher says then take him to be seen, don't be fobbed off with 'difficult child' theories

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Missy

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Saturday, March 11th 2006, 12:26pm

Sun, how old were you when it was recognised?

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Saturday, March 11th 2006, 12:33pm

25, and only by accident as I bumped into a wall going in to the GP's and then couldnt get my words out properly, and it was a stand-in GP for my GP who was on hols and the stand-in happened to specialise in this sort of thing. no treatment can be done at this stage, just recognition, and it wasnt ever a severe case (ie dyspraxia+dyslexia+ADD which is quite common).

Rufus

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  • "Rufus" started this thread

Posts: 1,259

Reg: Oct 3rd 2005

Location: N Ireland

Children: One son, aged 8, daughter 1

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Sunday, March 12th 2006, 7:23pm

Thanks everyone. Appreciate your help. Hoping to have another chat with teacher once he is 5 to see if there is any improvement. Then i think I'll see gp after that. Have come to the conclusion that I'm prob dyspraxic too!

Thanks again Lesa x
Keep smiling :happy:




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