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roxy7

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Reg: Dec 1st 2008

Location: Sheffield

Children: DS born 11/06

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Friday, May 7th 2010, 5:07pm

My Twin Breastfeeding Experience

I breastfed my first born for 15 months and was committed to breastfeeding my second child. When the pregnancy turned out to be a twin one, I had the same intention. However, from the point at which I attended the twin antenatal days held at the hospital, the message from the health professionals seemed to be one of, whilst not actively discouraging exclusive breastfeeding, an implication that it was unlikely that this was practical or possible and that mixed feeding was more realisable. The two sets of parents who came along to talk about their experiences were either feeding their twins with Artificial Infant Milk (AIM) or mixed feeding.

I started to wonder if exclusive breastfeeding was possible with twins but, fortunately, the internet proved to be a good resource in finding other mothers who had exclusively breastfed and I corresponded with a few of them to gain knowledge and advice. I wanted to be as prepared as possible and read up on breastfeeding generally and found the La Leche book “Mothering Multiples” to be really helpful, although almost a little too detailed pre-birth. The prospect of breastfeeding for 12 hours plus a day seemed daunting, but at least I had an idea of what to expect. I also contacted the NCT in advance of the birth to get some contact details of breastfeeding counsellors in case I had any problems. Having breastfed already, I felt it was important to be able to access help urgently if a difficulty arose.

I started to tell people “I will be breastfeeding these babies” when asked, rather than the more equivocal “I hope to breastfeed”. I bit my tongue and nodded at well meaning friends who told me not to put any undue pressure on myself in case it turned out to be too much to take on.

After a straightforward elective caesarean birth, the twins were put to my breast immediately in tandem and fed for five hours!

The intensity of that first week was incredible. I could not have survived without the EZ2 Nurse feeding pillow or Lansinoh! At first, the babies did not have a strong latch and one would latch on and slip off after a few minutes, or if I latched one on and turned to latch on the other, the first would slip off as I did so and the process would need to be restarted. This had the effect of causing my nipples to be incredibly sore, which is to be expected initially in any attempt to breastfeed, but they had a lot more trauma than if I had been feeding a singleton. On the first night after surgery, bedbound as I still had a catheter in, it felt like I had buzzed the midwives a hundred times to help me latch the babies onto my nipples. My milk took a while to come in (I suspect it didn’t do fully until about nine or ten days as it was only then that I began to feel engorged) and the colostrum did not satisfy the babies for very long so they wanted to feed sometimes literally every five minutes or so. The babies were more settled in the day and frustratingly would be calm and sleepy during visiting hours when my partner was there – I kept insisting to him that it wasn’t like this at night (once home he soon realised this was true!) Late afternoon they would start to cluster feed furiously until about 7 am the following day. I was feeding almost constantly and getting about an hour’s sleep per night. One night I only slept from 4am to 4.25 am! I felt a little crazed with sleep deprivation by the time I left hospital but I knew that once home it would be easier as I had my partner and mother to support me, rather than having to share the nighttimes with an overworked midwife and ward support staff amongst twenty other women.

On the whole, the midwives at the hospital were encouraging of my intentions. However, among some of the staff, any complaint about how hard I was finding breastfeeding resulted in what seemed to be the knee jerk advice that I could “top up” or switch to AIM. For example, on Day 2, I complained about my sore nipples which had blisters on blisters and were cracked and a little bloody. “What can I do about this?” Rather than recommending nipple cream (which I found worked wonders) or expressing a little milk onto them and letting them air dry, AIM was suggested. When I said I was absolutely exhausted following four days of near constant breastfeeding, AIM was suggested instead of words of encouragement or advice that this initial intensity was to be expected but would pass. When things were really hard in the nights, I went so far as repeating mantras to myself, such as “Formula does not exist in my world” and reminding myself that if I was in Norway, I wouldn’t have access to AIM without a prescription and if I lived in some parts of the world, wouldn’t have access to AIM at all! On discharge, staff were delighted when I stuck it out and were very complimentary of my determination and efforts.

Once home, I continued to feed constantly for the next few days. That was my full time 24/7 job. My partner did everything else including putting the babies onto the EZ2 for me, nappy changes, winding, washing, clothes changing, cooking and my mother looked after our toddler. The babies had lost 8 and 9% of their body weight and, although they had been slowly regaining it, by day 7, when feeding had started to calm down a little, my community midwife was concerned that twin 1 had “static” weight gain. She had gained only 20g in 3 days. Her “protocols” told her that the weight gain should be averaging 30g per day. I had been pleased that the previous night the twins had slept for five hours but this was frowned upon and I was told I needed to wake them if they slept for more than 3 hours. She also suggested that I “top up” with AIM. When I refused, she contacted a colleague who suggested the same. She went away saying that she would return in two days to check on the twins’ progress. I was feeling really anxious and upset myself by this time and also quite undermined. This is where my contacts came into their own. I phoned the breastfeeding counsellor who asked whether the midwife’s charts were adjusted for twins (they were not) and whether she had taken on board the fact that I’d had a caesarean so my milk would be slower to come in. Also, she asked me how I thought the babies were doing (very well) and said she would not have a cause for concern unless they had failed to regain their body weight by 14 to 21 days. I consulted my GP who gratifyingly agreed: unless there was a “scrawny” baby who was losing weight or failing to thrive, then she was not worried until the 3 week mark. My La Leche book reminded me that AIM should only be given if there was a good medical reason for doing so and that giving AIM or expressing breastmilk at such an early stage and giving it via a teat might result in a baby that was less likely to want to suckle at the breast – I reminded myself that demand dictated my milk supply and settled down with my EZ2 for some determined hours of full on nursing. By day 10, twin 1 had regained her body weight and more (putting on 190g in two days) and twin 2 had done so by day 14. My milk came in and supply no longer seemed to be an issue.

It’s day 16 now and here I am at my computer typing up my experience so things have certainly improved! The babies are sleeping for 3 hour stretches and in the night they wake about 3am and 6am for a feed. It is so much more manageable and we have left the house on 3 or 4 occasions – life is resembling something approaching normality and we seemed to be over the difficult bit.

It’s been incredibly hard work and so tiring but I’m so glad I stuck it out. I have to be honest and say I don’t know how possible it would have been without the support of at least one other adult round the clock (my mum came and stayed for the first two weeks, in addition to my partner being there). The twins are doing fantastically and I feel quietly confident that we can continue to breastfeed and it will get only more straightforward as they grow and develop.







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

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Location: Manchester

Children: Twins!

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Friday, May 7th 2010, 5:42pm

Thanks Roxy for such an inspiring post! [zx127]
I really hope that I will have your resolve when it comes to my turn as I would like to breastfeed my little ones sooo much too.
Glad to hear you and the babies are doing so well. :flowers:
* Emma * :smile:
TTC 8 yrs PCOS - Clomidx10 - IVFx3
Nov 2009 Last try: Short protocol ICSI - wonderful BFP!!! -
TWINS!!
: D

roxy7

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Saturday, May 8th 2010, 2:45pm

Thanks Aiwah. It does take determination but in my case at any rate it was only for a short period of time. We'd broken the back of it by about day 10. Things are loads easier now, helped by the fact that my lovely MIL is taking them out for long walks after they've had a feed and letting me get some much needed rest (or play on the internet!)







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

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Location: Abbots Langley

Children: Otis and Ava, July 2010 following successful FERC

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Saturday, May 8th 2010, 7:50pm

Roxy

Just like Aiwah your post is inspirational. I've already got my EZ-2 pillow off Ebay but think your tips about gettign contact with a breast feeding counsellor before they arrive. Think the tips your counsellor mentioned were great and I think I'll make a note of them for the future as I know a Twin Mummy who lives near me was mixed feeding by week 2.

Please keep us upto date on how thigns go.

Pushoz
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FET Oct/Nov - BFP

It's Twins!!!!!




Indiechick

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Tuesday, May 11th 2010, 9:25am

Just a word of warning for those of you who have an inflatable EZ2 Pillow . . . . DH blew mine up till it popped, needless to say he was in BIG trouble! Quickly ordered another one and I was in charge of inflating it from there on! :snigger:


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
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Tuesday, May 11th 2010, 6:16pm

Thanks for your story Roxy, I'm also exclusively breastfeeding, but my experience has been totally different from yours- Can post mine here too if anyone is interested. My biggest problem is positioning for feeding and been thinking of getting the EZ2 nurse pillow (I can get an inflatable one posted to Germany for not too much P&P), are they good? I find that one twin seems to slip down the gap between a normal V-pillow and me, especially when I have to burp one of them.


4x IUI
Mar 08 IVF BFN
Jun 08 ICSI BFN
Sep 08 ICSI BFN
Oct 08 FET BFN
Apr 09 ICSI brief BFP
Aug 09 ICSI :BFP:

Me 40, DH 38

Our dream came true,


Lukas and Finn were born 13/04/10 at 36w6d biggrin2
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Bry

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Tuesday, May 11th 2010, 6:26pm

Thank you. Roxy for your story! Sounds like you are doing an amazing job!

I too have ordered the ez2 pillow but in foam. I've heard the inflatable one is a bit of a pain?

Claire I would def be interested to hear your story. Getting a bit worried about it and any info helps!

X

My Diary - Bry and the Flumps!


1st IVF March 09 :BFP: mm/c at 9 weeks :bawl:
2nd IVF Oct 09 :BFP: [zx076] [zx076]


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Tuesday, May 11th 2010, 6:41pm

Hello ladies,

Claire - it's definatley worth investing in one, I couldn't have survived without it. Well done you for persevering. I too had a very different experience to Roxy but by 6 weeks it had become a lot easier and by 8 weeks I couldn't believe I'd ever struggled. My two would slip and slide all over the place if I tried to do it with a V pillow and so the EZ2 was the way to go.

I found the inflatable one good in the sense that I had it fully pumped up (not over pumped like DH did :snigger: ) for when they were tiny and I was able to adjust the amount of air in it as they got bigger (or my boobs got more saggy) and needed to be lower down. By 6 months I didn't use anything, just my arms for a bit of support.

When I did use a V pillow I found it easier to sit on the sofa with my knees up, the pillow resting on my thighs and the boys propped up right . . . LOL, not sure I've described it very well! :P


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
2 beautiful boys born 16/04/09

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Wednesday, May 12th 2010, 9:20am

This is a brilliant post, Roxy.

I did not have particularly strong feelings about breast feeding before my girls were born and thought I would probably mix fed, but as they as so tiny and in SCBU being looked after by other people, it is the least I can do. The girls have been exclusively fed on expressed breast milk since my milk came in on day 4 or 5. They are fed through a nasal-gastric tube directly into their tummies so I do not need to worry about them getting used to being bottle fed (and they don't seem to mind it at all). As their sucking reflex has now started to develop they are being put on the breast a couple of times a days at the same time as they are fed through their tube so that they begin to associate a full tummy with sucking. One of the nurses has been wonderful about spending time with me and making sure the girls are properly latched on when they try to feed.

The girls have not really put on any weight since birth and are both less than 4lbs so a breast milk fortifier is being added to my expressed milk to fatten them up. This is NOT formula, but is something prescribed by the doctor on the basis that it is medically necessary.

Although I am not particularly well informed about breast feeding, one of the things I have picked up from FZ duing my pregnancy is that it works on a supply and demand basis. Not having my girls with me means that I have to simulate the demand myself and that has meant expressing every 3 hours round the clock to build up my supply. Getting up at 3am and 6am to 'feed' without the stimulus of my girls to motivate me has been incredibly hard but I am now managing to express enough to feed both of them plus putting a couple of bottles in the freezer each day.

I cannot speak highly enough of my Medela Freestyle double electric breast pump. It was a bit on the pricey side (although it is possible to rent something similar from hospitals) and when I bought it DH told me I was mad and would never use it. How wrong he was....I spend about 4 hours a day attached to the bloody thing!! I am now able to express about 8 ozs (250 mls) in around 30 minutes and it has a hands free attachment which is a lifesaver.

Obviously I am having a very different breast feeding experience to Roxy, and we still have a long way to go before the girls are actually feeding on the breast, but I wanted to post this to let other mums of premature twins know that it is possible to feed your babies exclusively on breast milk.
Newly Wed

ICSI December 2008 - chemical pregnancy
ICSI May 2009 - BFN
FET September 2009 - BFP
Beautiful twin girls born 30 April 2010


This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Newly Wed" (May 12th 2010, 9:23am)


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Wednesday, May 12th 2010, 4:29pm

I just want to add that all you ladies have done fantastically and it is so refreshing to hear people being passionate about breastfeeding - i'm a breastfeeding peer supporter and i find it so frustrating at the lack of support from midewifes etc
I think this is a brilliant thread
blowkiss


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- BFP
Trying for No 2 - BFP


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Wednesday, May 12th 2010, 4:43pm

Newlywed, fantastic news to hear the girls are getting on well and you are managing to express and feed. It must feel wonderful for you to hold them close and feed them, some real Mummy bonding time. A huge well done to you, it must be incredibly hard for you at the moment but I think you are doing a marvellous job! x


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
2 beautiful boys born 16/04/09

roxy7

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Thursday, May 13th 2010, 8:34am

I'm loving all the replies ladies. Newlywed, you sound like you are doing incredibly well. I take my hat off you for all the expressing. It's a moving story. I was rubbish at it with my first born and attempts at it usually had me reduced to tears as I tried for half and hour only managing to express and ounce. I would really appreciate hearing others' experiences. I suspect that my experience has been easier than some because I've breastfed before and done the peer supporter training - it really helps to have some breastfeeding education because, as sammysue says, there is mixed support from health professionals. In my area, peer supporters come to your house to help on discharge so it really is worth investigating what sort of help there is in your locality so you can call on it in an emergency. One of my girls is still struggling to latch properly (she "clucks" sucking in air when she feeds and this gives her wind) despite all my efforts and it is making my nipples a little sore so I may well call on them again (they visited me in hospital too so it's worth seeing if your hospital has them in situ).

I have the EZ2 Foam pillow and have am interesting set up here. A few things that have helped me on the practical side of things have been (and don't laugh too much, I think we've been rather innovative!!!): my electric bed which I am still sleeping on. It was £200 from ebay and worth every penny as it meant I could lift and lower myself into easy breastfeeding positions and get up and down off the bed without hurting my scar too much (it was fab during the last stages of the pregnancy too). Basically, at night, I sleep on the bed with the babies on me positioned on the EZ2 and feed one on demand, waking the other when the first wakes up - or I'd be feeding all night. I know co sleeping doesn't suit all, but for those who do, this works for me. I have made sure that there are no gaps they can fall down and I have my arms round them all night so they can't slip off. It certainly works well while they're so small. As I'm essentially trapped on the bed in this manner, my OH also rigged up the water container from his Platypus backpack water carrier on a chair next to the bed. This meant that I could drink loads of water via its tube whilst I was feeding the babies and I didn't ever run out (I often drink two litres of water in the night due to remain hydrated). I'm in a separate room at the moment because our own bed is very low and I can't get up and down off it so we also acquired walkie talkies and if I need OH in the night, I just call him on the walkie talkie ("Over"!). He comes in for nappy changes and sometimes helps me to wind the babies.

A few questions: How much family/other support do you all have? My OH has been here full time so far, as has either my MIL or mum. I'm not sure how I would have managed without and MIL is going home tomorrow which I'm dreading slightly. It is getting easier but it's very tricky with two babies and a toddler. And how do you manage to get the your twins on the EZ2 without assistance? So far, I've had them passed to me but pretty soon, I'll have to learn to do this by myself. Also, do you change nappies in the night? OH has been doing but I'm wondering if it's necessary to do it as often as we have. There are no sore bums yet, so maybe I'm being a bit neurotic about it and they could survive til the morning.

R x







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

Indiechick

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Thursday, May 13th 2010, 9:46am

Hey Roxy

My DH was home with me for the first 12 weeks and I definatley think this is how I managed to successfully breastfeed.

As for nappys, my two went after every feed and so did need changing but by 6 weeks I only did it if necessary, Getting them ont o the pillow to feed was a rather ungaceful manner, I used to scoop them up and whack them on . . . . . poor things!


3rd IUI - 08/08/08 - tested 22/08/08 BFP :D
Scan 09/09/08 - 2 [zx076] [zx076] TWINS!
2 beautiful boys born 16/04/09

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Thursday, May 13th 2010, 7:09pm

Hello, got around to getting back on here! My breastfeeding experience has been pretty positive so far. I fed them very soon after their birth, but not very much during the rest of the day as they were so sleepy, one of the nurses said that was fine, but with hindsight I would have tried to feed them more. I was very lucky and had DH with me in the hospital for all 5days/4 nights (we had to pay for him to stay but it was worth it). So he handed the babies over whenever they needed feeding. On the 3rd day they had lost 10% of their body weight, so had to be topped up with formula, but the hospital is very pro-breastfeeding (they follow a set of guidlines from Unicef and the WHO), and the formula was fed from medicine cups. They were weighed before and after each feed to see how much they were getting and the amound of formula was dependent on that. My milk came in by the end of day 2 (they were born at 8.35 and a8.36am). On day 4 they were getting enough at each feed so no more formula was required and when we had the final check-up on day 5, they had managed to regain some of their lost weight. Apart from the necessary top-up, no-one ever tried to persuade me away from breast-feeding and I had loads of help from the nurses with latching the babies on properly and getting hints for keeping them feeding (the hardest thing was keeping them awake to feed for long enough).

Finn generally had no problems latching on, Lukas had a habit of starting to suck before he was there so it was hard to get him to open his mouth (very funny to watch though!). One nipple got sore and cracked, but lansinoh helped with that (the hospital provided sachets) but after a week or so that was fine. After we got home from the hospital, we had daily visits from the midwife, and she has been very pleased with the boys' progress. Now we're on weekly visits. I've had no problems with supply, in fact, at 3weeks 6 days old, Finn had gained 1.05kg and Lukas 1.2kg from their birth weight (over 2lb each), which is well over what is needed and they have a lovely chubbiness now.

DH has been at home all the time which has been great, but I've been slowly practicing doing everything for myself ready for when he goes back to work next week. I can manage to position both boys to feed, by putting them on the sofa next the the chair I sit in to feed, then heaving them up one at a time, then latching them on. It would be fine if they didn't need burping. Lukas especially swallows a lot of air and trying to scoop one baby up means the other one usually loses their latch. The inflatable EZ2 cusion has gone from Ebay now (the one that would post to Germany), but will prob get foam one from twinsuk website although P&P is 39 GBP! The last 2 nights we actually managed to get some sleep as they went 4 hours from start to start of each feed. The feed process takes a while though, we do feed-change-feed. They tend to fall asleep before they're full so the change wakes them up enough to want a top-up. I hate changing nappies, as they seem to love pooing while they're being changed. Looking forward to when they poo less, as then wont change them in the night. They might not feed as much, but I wont mind feeding more often for 20-30 mins rather than the whole process taking 1- 1.5 hours (or longer if they wont settle afterwards).

Almost forgot, I was ill for a couple of days due to a blocked milk duct, I was feverish and generally felt dreadful. The midwife said it wasn't an infection and with changing the feeding position to help drain the blocked bit, and cooling with Quark (fromage frais?), I got better. It was awful at the time though, but had the advantage that I let DH do everything except feed with no guilt whatsoever and took a bit of pressure off myself. Poor Finn seems to suffer with tummy ache if I eat anything with onions in (I think that's the culprit).

Dreading next week a bit as I will have to manage completely on my own :scared: , and take the boys to the Drs on my own for a hip ultrasound. I have cried in frustration sometimes when I haven't managed to position the boys well, or my arms, back or tailbone is hurting from sitting still too long in a bad position, but I realise that I have had it a lot easier than some people. Roxy I don't know how you coped on so little sleep, I think I at least managed to get 4 hours every night. Think we're up for a rough night tonight, as recently they've been spending some time awake between feeds, but today they have slept all day,so I have a feeling they will be wide awake at night. I wake up whichever twin hasn't woken up, but sometimes it doesn't work as he just wont wake enough to feed!


4x IUI
Mar 08 IVF BFN
Jun 08 ICSI BFN
Sep 08 ICSI BFN
Oct 08 FET BFN
Apr 09 ICSI brief BFP
Aug 09 ICSI :BFP:

Me 40, DH 38

Our dream came true,


Lukas and Finn were born 13/04/10 at 36w6d biggrin2
My diary


roxy7

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Thursday, May 13th 2010, 8:00pm

Thanks for sharing your experience Claire. I'm dreading tomorrow and Fridays generally MIL goes home and OH in work so I'm on my own for most of the day with 3 of them - though we've got a mother's help coming for 3 hours. Interestng to hear your problem with onions. Both babies have terrible wind tonight and I've had raw onions in my salad - I suspected it was that. Beans caused a similar problem a few nights earlier.

I'm gonna have to practice getting them onto the pillow by myself.

R x







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

Posts: 975

Reg: Jul 22nd 2008

Location: Birmingham

Children: One beautiful daughter after 2nd ICSI attempt :) She was born October 2009

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Friday, May 14th 2010, 5:28pm

wow, well done on the BFing and getting them a little chubbiness already :thumbsup: you're doing a great job.
I've had blocked milk ducts a couple of times. As well as Quark (when I was in germany) I also put warm flannels on before feeding and pumped off anything they didn't drink afterwards. It does make you feel pretty rotten though doesn't it? Added to tiredness, it's like being on another planet.

So pleased you're doing so well, and good luck for when DH goes back to work! xfingers :)
Kisses to Finn and Lukas from Amelie (or should I say 'Kuessen'!)

x
me 42, DH 35
ICSI 1 2009 :(
ICSI 2 2009 :BFP:
ICSI 3 2011 :(
ICSI 4 2012 ??? hopefully!

roxy7

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Sunday, July 18th 2010, 9:09pm

Well, ladies, 12 weeks on and I'm still exclusively breasfeeding and it's so much easier. One twin is sleeping for up to five hours at night (although the other little minx would like to be attached to my nipple the whole night if I let her!), they've started napping together in the day for a few hours at a time and I can got ou and about without doing nothing but feeding them at every stop - they are sooooo lovely. Most mornings I could cry I'm so happy to have them!

My MIL likes to remind me that when she suggested in a fit of sympathy for my exhausted bedraggled self when the babies were feeding constantly and probably having a growth spurt that I offer a bottle of formula I told her "you'll have to poke my eyes out with hot knitting needles before I do that!" We compromised with 3 oz of EBM and I got a bit more sleep that night!

R x







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

    Germany

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Location: Germany

Children: Twin boys born April '10 thanks to ICSI

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Wednesday, July 28th 2010, 11:52am

Me too! I'm still exclusively breastfeeding and the boys are 15 weeks. The difficulties now are that they are so big that it's hard to keep them on the feeding cushion (especially if they start wriggling). The other problem is that as they sleep longer at night (record is 8 hours between feeds), my boobs are like concrete and it's hard for them to latch on. Finn struggles more, he makes loads of slurpy noises while he struggles to get a grip :smile: . Still it's all going well and I plan to continue. It's weird having big boobs, I never thought I'd say this, but I miss my small ones :snigger: .


4x IUI
Mar 08 IVF BFN
Jun 08 ICSI BFN
Sep 08 ICSI BFN
Oct 08 FET BFN
Apr 09 ICSI brief BFP
Aug 09 ICSI :BFP:

Me 40, DH 38

Our dream came true,


Lukas and Finn were born 13/04/10 at 36w6d biggrin2
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Posts: 3

Reg: Aug 27th 2010

Location: reading

Children: 2

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19

Friday, August 27th 2010, 8:15pm

Hi I think this thread is great I have been looking for some inspiring twinbreast feeding stories to share with the expectant parents in my multiple birth classes, would that be ok ?
galaxymummy
galaxy :)

Bells

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20

Saturday, August 28th 2010, 1:34pm

Hi Galaxymummy,

It's entirely up to each one of our ladies to decide whether they're happy with their personal stories being shared in classes which you run for profit. They're all probably busy with their babies so a resonse may take a while.

Thanks

Bells





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Posts: 693

Reg: Dec 22nd 2008

Location: London

Children: Beautiful twin daughters and two grown up stepdaughters

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21

Monday, January 17th 2011, 12:15pm

Bumping this for Aramass (and also wonder whether it might be easier to find in the feeding or parenting sections).

Posts: 1,026

Reg: May 9th 2009

Location: London

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22

Tuesday, January 18th 2011, 5:02pm

Thanks for bumping this NW!

I think this could do with going in the parenting section too as that's where the contributors will be!
Me: 37 Him: 42
Unexplained
IVF May 2010
:BFP: 10th June.
[zx076] [zx076]

my diary


roxy7

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  • "roxy7" started this thread

Posts: 1,044

Reg: Dec 1st 2008

Location: Sheffield

Children: DS born 11/06

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23

Friday, February 24th 2012, 12:13pm

Hi Ladies, loads has changed for me since I wrote that post and I certainly don't have as much time as I used to for forums sadly, this place was a godsend for me.

One thing that hasn't changed is the twins are happily breastfeeding. They're 22 months old now :)







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10




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