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Ros

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Thursday, January 21st 2010, 2:20pm

Anyone had/ having a classical c-section?

Hi ladies, a classical c section is where they cut the womb (and often the abdomen) vertically rather than low down horizonally. The low horizonal cut is the normal way c sections are done these days. I have to have a classical cut down from my tummy button (over an existing scar) due to previous bladder/ ureter surgery and am quite anxious about it. I know they were all the rage in the 1960's but I can't seem to find anyone who has had one of these recently so am doubting the experience of the surgeons and I know they have to cut through more womb tissue for this. Does anyone have any info or experiences of this?
Thanks x

After 5 years of endo surgery, clomid, 2 x MM/C, 2 x ICSI cycles and 1 PGD cycle,
beautiful twin girls born 8th Feb 2010, we are so grateful

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Thursday, January 21st 2010, 6:21pm

No a clue my lovely, but just wanted to say hi (and selfishly I love seeing my ticker!). I can't believe you are almost done cooking. Do you have a date yet?
Newly Wed

ICSI December 2008 - chemical pregnancy
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mrsjasper

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Thursday, January 21st 2010, 8:28pm

Hi Ros,
The only thing I know about a vertical cut in a C section is that it increases your risk of uterine rupture if you have a VBAC in any future pregnancies. This is because its not as strong as a horizontal wound once its healed due to the way muscle fibres lie (Ithink!). I would also imagine it will impact on breastfeeding more than a horizontal one because it reaches further up your abdomen and therefore the babies are more likely to kick it during feeding and make it sore. I am pretty sure your hospital will discuss this with you prior to your delivery, the hospital where I delivered DD2 usually see mums at 35 weeks if they want to discuss delivery options (why they don't do that with all pregnancie sis beyond me) but you could ask to see your consultant sooner and discuss your concerns with him/her.





Fi'smum

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Thursday, January 21st 2010, 9:20pm

Hi Ros -- can't believe you're at the stage of discussing delivery already!!

Classical c/s was how they were done originally, many moons ago, where they cut through the abdomen and the uterus up and down the way. What they did in the 1960s was not actually Classical - they did an up and down abdominal incision, but a horizontal lower uterine segment incision. If they've said you need a Classical, it's probably because there will likely be adhesions from your previous surgery, and they might not be able to get into the lower segment. With a scar in the upper uterine segment, there is a higher risk of rupture in a future labour, which is why it's not the first choice of method. So you don't have a labour in a future preg !!( since you're getting 2 for the price of one, you might not be planning any further pg. so it might not be an issue). When it comes to b/f you get someone to put the babies on pillows in rugby hold, which is probably what you'd be doing anyway with twins, so they won't be able to kick the sore bits.

Hope this helps. smile2

Love,

Chris (very- soon- to-be-granny :D )

xx

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Fi'smum" (Jan 21st 2010, 9:22pm) with the following reason: error


Ros

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Friday, January 22nd 2010, 1:30pm

Thanks ladies, I was hoping you both would see my post. The classical cut is due to the fact that my new ureter is reimplanted into my bladder exactly where a normal lower incision would have been made on the uterus so my urologist doesn't want the c section surgeon going anywhere near it incase they cut through the new ureter and cause a whole lot more problems. He has discussed it with my obs consultant. My fear is that neither of them will be around on the planned c section day if the babies don't last inside me that long. I will discuss at 35 weeks with the cons whether he wants to or not! I usually turn up with a big list of questions, ha ha.
They did mention that a future pregnancy could be dodgy, and definitely not have a VBAC, but I doubt I'd be lucky enough to get pregnant (and stay pregnant) again so I said I'd go with the classical cut which is safer for me. They said it didn't make any difference to the babies either way, I will just be so grateful to have these two, fingers crossed.

NW, I love seeing your ticker too! I don't have a date yet.

After 5 years of endo surgery, clomid, 2 x MM/C, 2 x ICSI cycles and 1 PGD cycle,
beautiful twin girls born 8th Feb 2010, we are so grateful

Mavis

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Friday, January 22nd 2010, 1:49pm

Hi Ros, please check this because I'm not 100% sure...

My impression was that a classical c-section was faster and easier for a surgeon to do. (Perhaps because there is less "stuff" in the way?) And this is why occasionally, women do end up having classical incisions when the c-section is an emergency, all be it a very urgent emergency.

So... I would assume that if your twinnies did arrive when your consultant was not available, it would be relatively easy for another surgeon to step in and do the classical section for you. Even if they do not have much experience in this type of incision, it should be a simpler operation. The downside is increased healing time for you due to the orientation and length of the incision through uterine muscle, and the issue with VBAC being riskier.

Eitherway, I think your twinnies will behave and come up at the scheduled time :D
M
x

Ros

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Friday, January 22nd 2010, 2:09pm

Thanks Willopants, that make sense. I have heard that a classical cut is used in real emergency situations too. I'm not sure why I am so untrusting of the surgeons other than my urologist and obs cons! It might be to do with the fact that they are the only two people who have operated on me in the past, I am lucky that my obs cons is also my endo cons. I even asked my urologist if he could do the c section, ha ha, but he's on holiday at 37-38 weeks. He said I could call him on his personal mobile if I need to, isn't that lovely?
I do expect to be in hospital longer but I might be wrong, we'll see ..... I have enough long life food and drink snacks to last quite a while :)

After 5 years of endo surgery, clomid, 2 x MM/C, 2 x ICSI cycles and 1 PGD cycle,
beautiful twin girls born 8th Feb 2010, we are so grateful

Mavis

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Friday, January 22nd 2010, 5:31pm

How fab that you have his number! And I think it is rather healthy to be untrusting of surgeons! But I am sure you will appropriately grill your consultant on Feb 4th on sections.

About your hospital stay, it might be longer for a classical because the incision is longer. I was told for a "regular" section for a singleton, the mum usually only needs to stay in 2 days. But they prefer mums of twins to stay in for 4 days to ensure the babies are feeding ok. So you may be in hospital for longer anyway, just because it is twins.




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